Published: June 29, 2016

The growing season

Research and quality-related activities are a high priority and will be even more critical for our Members and their patients in the upcoming years. A significant portion of our budget is dedicated to basic and clinical research as well as quality-related projects.


James C. Denneny III, MD AAO-HNS/F EVP/CEOJames C. Denneny III, MD
AAO-HNS/F EVP/CEO
Research and quality-related activities are a high priority and will be even more critical for our Members and their patients in the upcoming years. A significant portion of our budget is dedicated to basic and clinical research as well as quality-related projects. The 2016 Centralized Otolaryngology Research Efforts (CORE) leadership (including the boards and councils of all participating societies) has approved a portfolio  of 29 grants totaling $495,195. CORE has been in existence since 1985. The Outcomes Research  Evidence-Based Medicine (OREBM) Committee is completing a MarketScan obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) project that will compare single-level sleep surgery versus multi-level sleep surgery. Through their quarterly Bulletin feature, “Publications that may change your practice,” the committee informs our Members of key recent evidence-based studies that might change practice patterns. The Creating Healthcare Excellence through Education and Research (CHEER) network has completed two guideline gaps projects: Sudden Hearing Loss (funded through AAO-HNSF) and Tympanostomy Tubes (funded through  AAO-HNSF by use of MarketScan data).

The opportunity for clinical and patient outcomes research will expand as RegentSM, our clinical data registry, begins accepting participants early this fall following a successful pilot. The preliminary rule released by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on April 27, 2016, enforces acceptance of both QCDRs and Clinical Data Registries as mainstays in the post-MACRA era. Participation in these registries will considerably facilitate participation in the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) at all levels. For those interested in the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) reporting for 2016, it is essential that you enroll in RegentSM as soon as possible. Please contact us at Regent@ENTnet.org. You will also be able to view live demonstrations of Regent’s functionality and observe the practice dashboard available to all participants.

More exciting developments

A number of factors have contributed to recent discussions centered on multiple aspects of Graduate Medical Education (GME), including future funding issues, effectiveness, and workforce projections. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) held hearings on the 80-hour work week and accepted testimony on areas of success and concern. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) recently held a National Invitational Conference on the “Future of Surgical Training.” This was attended by the house of surgical specialties, and while some nuances specific to each specialty were identified, there were many common concepts identified, including the future use of simulation technology. The Academy has had an active Simulation Task Force for several years that was recently converted to an education committee chaired by Ellen S. Deutsch, MD. At this year’s Annual Meeting & OTO EXPOSM there will be a simulation reception demonstration. If you wish to participate, please submit your project through the Annual Meeting website.

I recently heard Manny Dominguez, PhD, at digitalNow (a summit for association leaders), describe the virtual hospital he created for the Veterans Health Administration. The graphics and interactive capability of the avatars were incredible. The potential of this technology in surgical training, patient training and education, skills assessment, and population management is truly exciting. Programs such as this will also enhance the capability of telemedicine and telehealth activities, which will become particularly beneficial as we face potential physician shortages and access problems predicted for the near future.

I attended a recent FDA hearing on hearing aids and sound amplifying devices, which included over-the-counter availability of these products and concerns about the ability of patients to properly use and maximally benefit from these devices without a comprehensive aural rehabilitation. Instructional products of the quality demonstrated by Dr. Dominguez could be a powerful adjunct for patients should those sales be allowed. These could be produced by hearing professionals and the industry with such quality that patients would benefit significantly.

Physician-astronaut keynote

I am very excited about this year’s Annual Meeting Opening Ceremony in San Diego. We have engaged a dynamic speaker, Mae Jemison, MD, a physician-entrepreneur-astronaut who conducted research aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor. She currently leads the 100 Year Starship (100YSS), an initiative seed-funded by DOD’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), to assure the capability for human interstellar space travel to another star is possible within the next 100 years. Her inspirational and futuristic comments will be a must for meeting attendees. Don’t miss her amazing presentation!

 

 


More from July 2016 - Vol. 35, No. 6

Participants indicated they most valued the mentorship and networking experience provided by the simulation. One participant remarked that she would have never had the courage to ask for what she needed to support her career without the skills and backing of the group leaders and participants. Not a photo of the course.
WOMEN IN OTOLARYNGOLOGY SECTIONTen complete inaugural Leadership Course
On a February 2016 evening video conference call, a group of 10 diverse female otolaryngologists completed the first Women in Otolaryngology (WIO) Section Leadership Course. Selected from a highly competitive application process, the group began the inaugural course created by Mona M. Abaza, MD, MS, and Carol R. Bradford, MD. Initiated with a generous grant from Medtronic, the course was modeled after the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) female faculty development courses and the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program at Drexel University. The intent was to help mentor and foster developing women leaders in the AAO-HNS. The course was launched at the March 2015 AAO-HNS/F Leadership Forum, starting with an all-day face-to-face workshop that evaluated participants’ Myers-Briggs personality types as they related to their leadership styles, and proceeded with the participants attending many leadership talks during the forum. Thereafter, the group met virtually, on a monthly basis, to explore a variety of skills. Participants tackled many of the complicated facets of leadership throughout the year, including conflict management styles and handling difficult conversations, identifying personal traits that can aid/hinder leadership styles, and gaining knowledge of various negotiation skills and types. At last fall’s Annual Meeting in Dallas, we had the opportunity to meet with leaders of the WIO Section and further develop their group bond and networking skills. Throughout the year, participants worked on capstone projects, both individually and as pairs or in groups. The format also provided a structure for peer-to-peer coaching. These projects had a positive impact for the AAO-HNS and Members’ regional areas. Several of the participants played a significant role in the mENTor Connect project and rollout. Other projects included development and promotion of local otolaryngology groups, the initiation of diversity and inclusion plans for residents, and the launch of a new female resident recognition award by the WIO Section. The group also had significant advancement in their service roles to the Academy. Several members of the group recently have been appointed/elected to leadership positions within the AAO-HNS. This includes the member-at-large for the WIO Section, the Board of Governors chair-elect, Young Physicians Section chair-elect, and the WIO Research and Survey Committee chair, to name a few. Also, Nikhila P. Raol, MD, MPH, was presented with the Holt Leadership Award for Residents and Fellows-in-Training at the 2015 Annual Meeting. All of the participants have played active roles within the AAO-HNS this year and hopefully will continue to expand their roles in the Academy and in their local communities in the future. Based on the feedback received, the group indicated they most valued the mentorship and networking experience provided by the course. One participant remarked that she would have never had the courage to ask for what she needed to support her career without the skills and backing of the group leaders and participants. Overall, the one most valued aspect for the participants was a safe place to explore their own self-knowledge and areas for improvements, as well as form bonds with each other. As women are still in the minority in our specialty, many do not have structures in their home locations that provide a place to discuss and explore solutions to many personal and professional issues. This program provided that structure for the group members and allowed them to expand those opportunities to others around them. All have indicated their desire to aid the mentoring of the next group, as well as continue to informally meet together. We are seeking funding to expand the pilot program for the coming year for 20 new participants. The addition of a professional leadership coach and consultant to the program will fortify the skills and techniques offered to the participants. As the face-to-face sessions were valued most highly by the group, despite the personal effort and cost incurred, two in-person sessions are being planned. The kick-off meeting is scheduled for Saturday, September 17, immediately before the AAO-HNSF 2016 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPOSM in San Diego, and the second face-to-face session will occur during the AAO-HNS/F 2017 Leadership Forum & BOG Spring Meeting in Alexandria, VA. Please contact WIO at wio@entnet.org for more information and/or to apply for one of the highly desired slots.