Classic California

May 2016 - Vol. 35, No. 04

diningSan Diego is the eighth largest city in the United States, and one of the easiest to enjoy. It is a vibrant city with breathing room. San Diego’s largest employer’s “fluid” workforce, the U.S. Navy, keeps some of its residents out of town. In September, summer tourists are back home, while some San Diego residents take advantage of the proximity to Mexico to the south, or head out for one of the many resort areas just to the north. With temperatures in the 70s and near-constant sunshine, San Diego is as close to perfect in the fall as anywhere in the U.S. contiguous states.

Getting there

Numerous airlines fly into San Diego International Airport (SAN, www.san.org), called Lindbergh Field locally, including JetBlue, Delta, Continental, and American.

A recent online search found flights on Continental from Newark Liberty International Airport starting at $415 round trip for travel in September.

Transportation to the convention center and close-by hotels is a quick 10-minute trip. Options for transport includes the Metropolitan Transit System (MTS, www.sdmts.com/home). Its Flyer, MTS bus route 992, provides direct service between downtown and the airport.

International travel tips

Visitor visas aren’t necessary for citizens of Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, or most citizens of European Union countries coming for tourism and staying for fewer than 90 days. If you require a visa, check now on the expected waiting time, depending on where you live. Apply for a visa at the U.S. consulate in your place of residence. Check the U.S. State Department’s special visa website for further information.

Cuisine

Photo by Ken Bohn/San Diego Tourism Authority

Photo by Ken Bohn/San Diego Tourism Authority

San Diego has it all when it comes to fresh and varied cuisine, artisanal breweries, local bistros, and gourmet restaurants. Top notes in international flavors include in Mexican, Brazilian, and Japanese dining with notable other favorites in Indian, Thai, Vietnamese, French, and Italian restaurants. Seafood gets top billing in local food traditions, and sourced California freshness enhances every experience. Check out these sources to plan for a flavorful stay:

Culture

San Diego boasts nine arts districts in one vibrant city. Should you linger in the city, its website (www.sandiego.org/what-to-do/arts-culture.aspx) entices you to see them all. Meeting attendees have a simple starting place for adults and families alike, Balboa Park. Designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1977, the park and its historic Exposition buildings, dating from 1915 and 1935, hosts its year-long centennial celebration of the 1915-16 exposition. Among its 1,200 acres, find the renowned San Diego Museum of Art; San Diego Zoo; Mingei International Museum; and the Tony Award-winning Old Globe Theatre (www.sandiego.gov/arts-culture).

Crafted for fun

One of America’s most family-friendly cities, San Diego is home to LEGOLAND, the New Children’s Museum, and the famous San Diego Zoo.

The 59-mile coastline invites exploration as it winds around sandy beaches, surfing hot spots, and marinas with boating options to get on the water. Downtown visitors have easy access to many cruises and charters—the sunset specials are especially worthwhile.

Sports and sporting events are more enticing than ever here, given the fabulous geography and weather. Golfing is one of the biggest draws attracting both serious and casual golfers. The Padres will be playing the Giants at home as the meeting concludes and the Chargers schedule will be out soon.

What more can a city offer? Find out at www.sandiego.org.